Posts Tagged Stormwater

When Less Is More – In the Garden

Hey gardeners and home owners out there, did you know that you could reduce the amount of toxins in our waters by following a few easy rules? It’s true and if you have a lawn or garden and occasionally use pesticides or herbicides to green it up, we have a little recommendation that could go…

The Road Less Traveled: Pervious Pavement & Other Green Surfaces for Your Home

Impervious surfaces, or areas that do not allow water to absorb into the ground, blanket a large portion of urban Los Angeles. Most of us only have to look as far as our driveways to find a concrete, asphalt or brick surface that is impervious. While surfaces of this sort are useful in controlling flooding,…

Board Passes Low Impact Development Ordinance!

The Stormwater Program is excited to announce that on January 15, 2010 the Low Impact Development (LID) ordinance was approved by a unanimous City of Los Angeles Board of Public Works’ vote. The ordinance will require 100% of runoff from a storm of three-quarter-inch magnitude to be captured or reused at new homes, larger commercial…

Who will be affected by LA’s Low Impact Development ordinance?

You may be wondering how you and your community may be affected by LA’s proposed Low Impact Development (LID) ordinance. Here’s how. The proposed Low Impact Development Ordinance will require that all new construction or redevelopment projects within Los Angeles capture the first ¾” of rain generated by a storm. This rainwater, once captured, will…

How will the Low Impact Development ordinance affect LA’s water quality?

A few of the water issues we face in Los Angeles such as stormwater pollution and water shortages will be positively impacted by the Low Impact Development (LID) ordinance. LID, of course, is not a cure all and implementing the tenets of LID will not eliminate stormwater pollution. However, as demonstrated by community-based projects like…

What Exactly is Low Impact Development (LID)?

Low Impact Development (LID) may seem like an oxymoron since development has to have some kind of impact. Right? Certainly any construction does impact its surroundings, but the effect development has on the local environment can actually be negative or positive. In laymen’s terms, LID refers to land planning and engineering practices that mitigate the…

Los Angeles and El Segundo Celebrate a Completed Water Quality Project

Los Angeles City Councilman Bill Rosendahl of District 11, El Segundo Mayor Kelly McDowell, Public Works Commissioner Paula Daniels and other dignitaries celebrated today the completion of the Imperial Highway Sunken Median Stormwater Best Management Practices (BMP) project. A gathering was held on Imperial Highway between Pershing Drive and Main Street, and was concluded with…

El Nino-He's Back…

In July, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) scientists announced the return of El Niño, a climate phenomenon with significant influence on global weather. Occurring, on average, once every two to seven years and typically lasting 12 months, El Niño is the warming of central and eastern tropical Pacific Ocean waters. Generally, an El Niño…

Stormwater Reuse Bill Passes in California

A new California bill seeks to expand the role of stormwater management to incorporate strategies that will use it as a resource. The Stormwater Resource Planning Act, SB 790, allows municipalities to tap funds from two of the state’s existing bond funds and use the money for projects that reduce or reuse stormwater, recharge the…

2009 Stormwater Mitigation Handbook for LA Builders and Developers

The City of Los Angeles recently produced a new Standard Urban Stormwater Mitigation Plan (SUSMP) handbook entitled How to Build Protection for Mother Nature Into Your Project for local designers and developers. To view or download the handbook, click here. Depending on the type of project, either a Standard Urban Stormwater Mitigation Plan (SUSMP) or…

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