Posts Tagged Pollution Prevention

The Road Less Traveled: Pervious Pavement & Other Green Surfaces for Your Home

Impervious surfaces, or areas that do not allow water to absorb into the ground, blanket a large portion of urban Los Angeles. Most of us only have to look as far as our driveways to find a concrete, asphalt or brick surface that is impervious. While surfaces of this sort are useful in controlling flooding,…

Rainwater Resolutions for Rover

It’s hard to believe that we’re already celebrating a new year and a new decade! It seems like just yesterday we were all ushering in a new millennium and hoping Y2K wouldn’t impact us too much. With the start of 2010, we’re all making resolutions, so how about keeping your dog in mind when making…

Board Passes Low Impact Development Ordinance!

The Stormwater Program is excited to announce that on January 15, 2010 the Low Impact Development (LID) ordinance was approved by a unanimous City of Los Angeles Board of Public Works’ vote. The ordinance will require 100% of runoff from a storm of three-quarter-inch magnitude to be captured or reused at new homes, larger commercial…

City of L.A. Surpasses Trash Limit Milestone of 50% Reduction

After investing nearly $50 million toward retrofitting 30,000 catch basins in the city to reduce trash and debris from entering our storm drains, the City of L.A. recently announced we have achieved an over 60% reduction in trash that enters Ballona Creek and the Los Angeles River. Trash Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), which refers…

Who will be affected by LA’s Low Impact Development ordinance?

You may be wondering how you and your community may be affected by LA’s proposed Low Impact Development (LID) ordinance. Here’s how. The proposed Low Impact Development Ordinance will require that all new construction or redevelopment projects within Los Angeles capture the first ¾” of rain generated by a storm. This rainwater, once captured, will…

How will the Low Impact Development ordinance affect LA’s water quality?

A few of the water issues we face in Los Angeles such as stormwater pollution and water shortages will be positively impacted by the Low Impact Development (LID) ordinance. LID, of course, is not a cure all and implementing the tenets of LID will not eliminate stormwater pollution. However, as demonstrated by community-based projects like…

What Exactly is Low Impact Development (LID)?

Low Impact Development (LID) may seem like an oxymoron since development has to have some kind of impact. Right? Certainly any construction does impact its surroundings, but the effect development has on the local environment can actually be negative or positive. In laymen’s terms, LID refers to land planning and engineering practices that mitigate the…

Taking the Boo out of Bacteria

You can’t see it but it’s there, hiding out, just waiting for you in the storm drain. It’s not a ghost or a scary monster, although it is certainly frightening. It’s bacteria. Unlike other stormwater pollutants such as oil and litter, bacteria cannot be seen with the naked eye. While most environmental microorganisms are part…

Wicked Wildfires with Wet Weather…Watershed Woes

Wicked wildfires and frightful floods are a natural and challenging part of the ecological cycle here in California. Fire is essential in Mediterranean ecosystems with certain species of native plants needing fire to guarantee their existence. All too often, however, these fires take place in the fall when the flames are fanned by fierce Santa…

El Nino-He's Back…

In July, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) scientists announced the return of El Niño, a climate phenomenon with significant influence on global weather. Occurring, on average, once every two to seven years and typically lasting 12 months, El Niño is the warming of central and eastern tropical Pacific Ocean waters. Generally, an El Niño…

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