Rainwater Gets a Second Chance

Planning efforts for the Proposition O funded Westside Park Rainwater Irrigation Project are currently underway and runoff from 3,700 acres of land adjacent to South Fairfax Avenue will be targeted in an effort to reduce stormwater pollution that currently flows into Ballona Creek and Santa Monica Bay.

Once completed this project will help to reduce beach closures, increase tourism, benefit marine habitat and enable the City to meet stormwater pollutant reduction goals while using stormwater to irrigate the park’s landscape.

“One of the big benefits of the Westside Park Rainwater Irrigation Project is how it will reduce the need for outside water sources for irrigation in this park,” says Wing Tam of the City of Los Angeles Stormwater Program. “In a drought year, using rainwater for irrigation will drastically reduce potable water use in the area and cut our expenses significantly.”

Reusing rainwater is at the heart of the Westside Park Rainwater Irrigation Project. Off-site surface runoff will be diverted from an existing storm drain to a lift station that will filter water through a screen removing floatable waste and heavy sediments. A filtration system consisting of a two-acre network of sub-surface irrigation pipes will provide water to the park’s natural vegetation through root uptake. Excess filtered stormwater will be stored in a series of underground chambers. Once these chambers reach their capacity, the surplus water is discharged towards a dry creek and back into a storm drain.

In addition, the Westside Park will benefit the surrounding neighborhood. A playground, that will be financed through sources other than Proposition O, will be developed providing children and their families with a Universally Accessible Playground to romp and play on during a sunny weekend afternoon. An outdoor fitness center featuring exercise equipment will draw health-enthusiasts of all ages. Lastly, a new solar-powered lighting system and fencing will make the surrounding community a safer place for the Angelenos who call the La Cienega/Fairfax area their home.

It is multi-beneficial projects like this that make our communities better,” says Cynthia Ruiz, president, Board of Public Works. “It is exciting that we are moving forward with this important stormwater improvement project that will not only affect Westside Park, but the neighborhood at large.”

Construction on the Westside Park Rainwater Irrigation Project will begin in July 2010 and end in July 2011.

 

Share

Comments (2)

  1. Avatar for LA Stormwater
    Steve
    July 30th, 2009 at 4:10 pm

    Hi Folks
    I am happy to here you are trying to use rainwater more efficiently with the Westside Park Rainwater Irrigation Project, but would like to make a suggestion. Stormwater harvesting? This is an age old concept I learned about this through Brad Lancaster's Book Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond Vol 1&2. He calls it Earthworks. It is basically basins and berms. I design rainwater harvesting systems and do not to harvest rain on the ground. It is dirty. If you would like to discuss this further let me know.

  2. Avatar for LA Stormwater
    BeWaterWise Rep
    August 19th, 2009 at 1:56 am

    Collecting rain water is an ideal opportunity to save water during a time of water scarcity.
    Places like Southern California are facing a water shortage and its time citizens did a rethink of the way they consume water. Simple things like turning of the faucets while brushing your teeth, taking shorter showers, installing smart sprinklers can save you gallons of water. For more tips on how to save water visit http://bit.ly/16PsAR

Share Your Comments With Us








  • We’re on Facebook!

  • Featured Videos

    Aerial Art at Kids Ocean Day 2010